Call for Papers and Conferences

Call for Papers Unintended: The Promises and Perils of Criminal Justice Reform Graduate Symposium Law Engaged Graduate Students March 16th, 2018 at Princeton University

Thu, 2018-01-11 12:52 -- manager
Call for Papers
 
Unintended: The Promises and Perils of Criminal Justice Reform
Graduate Symposium
Law Engaged Graduate Students
 
March 16th, 2018 at Princeton University
 
In the last few years policymakers on both sides of the political aisle and across the country have turned their attention to criminal justice reform. Such reforms represents decades of work undertaken by activists, social scientists, and policy experts to respond to  the negative consequences of “tough on crime” legislation. Pointing to the devastating effects of mass incarceration and the disproportionate impacts of these policies on poor people and people of color, the huge cost of these programs on state and local budgets, and the way these policies have further frayed community and police relations, a consensus has emerged that the criminal justice policies of the past several decades have failed and that reform is needed. While this shift in policy priorities is to be lauded, a small but growing number of scholars raise the question of whether reform is enough. These critics wonder about the long term efficacy and potential “unintended” consequences of criminal justice reform, making the case that more drastic policy must be undertaken and that reform cannot begin and end with the criminal justice system. Inspired by these critiques, this symposium asks that we take a step back and examine this criminal justice reform closely, creating the space for dialogue and debate about the “unintended,” unforeseen, and unanticipated impacts of reform efforts.
 
Taking up the notion of “unintended” this symposium seeks to reposition it to ask a number of question that might provoke scholars, activists, and policymakers and provide the opportunity to explore  the multiple meanings and varied intentions that underlie the criminal justice reform movement. 1) what are some of the actual and potential unintended consequences of current criminal justice reform efforts? 2) how do we know such consequences are unintended? 3) are the emergence of particular “unintended” consequences to be understood as a surprise, as inherent to the task of policymaking, or can they be anticipated? If so, how? If not, why? And finally, 4) in what ways does an attention to the unintended consequences of reform point to the limitations of reform, and in what ways does it cue us to its openings and possibilities?
 
To encourage a diverse array of perspective we are calling on papers from graduate level scholars from across the social science disciplines (law, history, anthropology, sociology, economics, political science, criminology). We seek to foster interdisciplinary dialogue that draws attention to the multiple valences of criminal justice reform policy, their overlapping continuities, tensions, and blindspots, and in the end create a set of pathways for critically engaging and understanding reform efforts. This daylong symposium is a chance for new scholars to share their work, receive feedback and commentary, and develop a network of critical voices undertaking this tremendously important issue.
 

 

We ask that graduate scholars send a 250-word abstract of their paper no later than January 15th, 2018 tocrimreform@gmail.com. If you have any questions please do not hesitate to ask.

 

22nd UBC Interdisciplinary Legal Studies Graduate Conference-may 10-11, 2018

Thu, 2018-01-11 12:50 -- manager

Graduate students from all disciplines are invited to participate in the 22nd UBC Interdisciplinary Legal Studies Graduate Conference, to be held at the Peter A. Allard School of Law at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, on May 10–11, 2018.

This conference will offer graduate students a unique interdisciplinary opportunity to engage with contemporary perspectives in law and other disciplines. CONFERENCE THEME: LAW AND CONTEMPORARY PROBLEMS

Today’s world is rapidly being transformed by technological, political, social, and environmental changes. Law must adapt. There are no easy answers, but disciplines outside of law can provide valuable tools and perspectives that law should engage with in order to meet these challenges. The world faces issues such as the global rise of nationalism; refugee and migration crises; the rise and fall of world powers and the reimagining of North-South relations; the development and use—legal or otherwise—of cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin and Ethereum; issues in business and human rights; income and wealth inequality; myriad environmental problems including the effects of a rapidly changing climate; the increasing ubiquity of digital technologies and the Internet; transitional justice; and even the potential exploitation of natural resources in outer space. Further, law and legal scholarship have changed, often in response to these same world issues: social care law; increased attention to law and the third world; corporate regulation and corporate social responsibility; global insurance regulation; trends in international and domestic tax policies; new regulation of carbon emissions; climate change litigation; transnational climate law; a reemergence of indigenous law; new dimensions in criminal justice; regulation of the urban space; contemporary feminism; and other new developments in legal theory. We look forward to receiving submissions on these and any related topics not listed here. submissions Submissions should include the title of the paper or project, a 250-word abstract in English, the author’s name, email address, institutional affiliation and phone number.

Presenters should be current graduate students or must have recently completed graduate studies. Exceptional proposals from undergraduate, LL.B. or J.D. students may be accepted. An up-to-date CV should be submitted along with the abstract. Please submit abstracts via email to: ubclaw gradconference2018@gmail.com with “Submission” included in the subject line by February 2, 2018.

Please ensure all attached documents’ file names begin with your last name. Successful applicants will be notified via email by February 16, 2018. The completed papers will be due on March 30, 2018. Accepted participants must register and pay the $100 (CAD) registration fee by March 30, 2018. An additional fee of $50 (CAD) will be payable by conference participants who wish to attend the conference dinner on May 10, 2018. Accepted participants are responsible for their own travel and lodging arrangements. Please feel free to address any questions, comments, or concerns to Godwin Dzah, Chair of the 2018 UBC Interdisciplinary Legal Studies Graduate Conference, at elidzah1@mail.ubc.ca (and cc: godwindzah@gmail.com)

University of New Brunswick's third annual Peace and Friendship Treaty Days

Sat, 2017-09-23 14:13 -- manager

The Mi'kmaq-Wolastoqey Centre at the University of New Brunswick is proud to announce that registration is now open for the University of New Brunswick's third annual Peace and Friendship Treaty Days, to be held this year onOctober 23 and 24, 2017 on the University of New Brunswick's Fredericton campus. 

To register and for further details, go to http://www.unb.ca/conferences/peaceandfriendshiptreatydays/

On this, the 150th anniversary of the passage of the British North America Act, the Mi’kmaq-Wolastoqey Centre at the University of New Brunswick will hold the University of New Brunswick’s 3rd annual Peace and Friendship Treaty Days. Events will include a keynote talk by Senator Daniel Christmas, an active leader in the Membertou First Nation in Cape Breton and the Mi'kmaw Nation of Nova Scotia, a re-enactment of the signing of the Treaty of 1725, the first Peace and Friendship Treaty between the Wabanaki Nations and the British Crown, and a colloquium, which will address topics related to the role of Indigenous political traditions and treaty-making, especially among the Wabanaki nations, in providing the inspiration and foundation for the creation and evolution of the Confederation of the British North American colonies from 1867 to today.

The 150th anniversary of the legal creation of the political community we know as Canada is certainly worthy of celebration, but Canadian Confederation is neither merely 150 years old nor is it solely the creation of white colonists. The roots of Confederation rest in the nourishing soil of Indigenous political traditions of confederacies, including the Wabanaki Confederacy, and were fed by the tradition of treaty-making between Indigenous nations and the British Crown. The Peace and Friendship Treaties between the British Crown and the nations of the Wabanaki Confederacy were among the earliest of these treaties. As well, despite the efforts of federal governments since Confederation to make Indigenous peoples invisible in Canada’s political community through assimilationist policies, the resilience of Indigenous peoples has meant that Indigenous political traditions continue to influence the evolution of the Canadian political community today.

We welcome you to participate in this year's UNB Peace and Friendship Treaty Days. Remember, to register and for further information, go to http://www.unb.ca/conferences/peaceandfriendshiptreatydays/

 

Appel à communications: Technologies de la justice

Wed, 2017-09-13 12:30 -- manager

 

Appel à communications                                                                                                    

Technologies de la justice                                                                                                          

Faculté des sciences sociales et humaines                                                                                           

Institut universitaire de technologie de l’Ontario                                                                          

Oshawa, Ontario                                                                                                         

26 au 28 janvier 2018

Nous vous invitons à soumettre des propositions de communications et de panels (100 à 150 mots) qui abordent le thème des technologies de la justice à partir d'une gamme de points de vue théoriques et méthodologiques. Nous accueillons des réflexions portant sur la façon dont la loi s'attaque aux changements technologiques, ainsi sur la loi elle-même en tant que technologie de (l’in)justice. Ainsi, le colloque offrira des occasions d'explorer ce que cela signifie que de « faire » justice et d'aborder les innovations et les défis dans la manière dont la justice est menée. Le colloque aura lieu les vendredi 26 et samedi 27 janvier au centre-ville d'Oshawa, et la réunion annuelle de mi-hiver de l'Association canadienne droit et société est prévue pour l’avant-midi du dimanche 28 janvier.

Veuillez faire parvenir votre proposition de communication ou de panel de 100 à 150 mots (ainsi qu’une biographie de 100 à 150 mots) à technologyofjustice@uoit.ca.

La date limite de soumission est le vendredi 6 octobre 2017.

Call for Papers and Panel Proposals: Technologies of Justice

Wed, 2017-09-13 12:27 -- manager

Call for Paper and Panel Proposals Technologies of Justice                                                                                                       

Faculty of Social Science and Humanities                                                                                

University of Ontario Institute of Technology                                                                            

Oshawa Ontario January 26-28 2018

We invite proposals (100-150 words) for papers and panels that engage the theme of Technologies of Justice from a range of theoretical and methodological perspectives. We welcome studies of how law is coming to grips with technological change; moreover, we encourage scholarly work concerned with law itself as technology of (in)justice. Thus, the conference offers opportunities to explore what it means to do justice and to addresses innovations and challenges in the way justice is done. The symposium will take place Friday January 26th and Saturday 27th in downtown Oshawa, and the annual mid-winter meeting of the Canadian Law & Society Association is scheduled for the morning of Sunday January 28th.

Please email 100-150 word paper abstracts and panel proposals (along with 100-150 word bios of presenters) to technologiesofjustice@uoit.ca

Deadline for submission is Friday October 6th 2017.                                                                                      

Brazil-Japan Litigation and Society Seminar

Tue, 2017-09-12 13:37 -- manager
 
All are invited to the "Brazil-Japan Litigation and Society Seminar,” a result of the partnership between the University of Sao Paulo (USP) and the University of Shinshu. The event will occur on 08-09 January 2018, at the Matsumoto campus, Japan.The program and call for papers are attached. Abstracts are due Sept. 15th.

CRDS Conférence Droit et Société: Droit et contrainte

Sun, 2017-06-18 18:33 -- manager

Conférence Droit et Société : Droit et contraintes

 

Le Collectif de Recherche Droit et Société (CRDS) de l’UQAM lance un appel à communications pour sa toute première conférence.

 

Lieu : Université du Québec à Montréal (Département de Sciences juridiques)

 

Date : 23 et 24 novembre 2017

 

Date limite pour soumission : 31 Juillet 2017, à minuit

 

Le Collectif de Recherche en Droit et Société (CRDS) du Département des sciences juridiques de l’UQAM a le plaisir de vous annoncer la tenue du colloque « Droit et contraintes » les 23 et 24 novembre 2017.

Nous invitons les étudiants et étudiantes aux cycles supérieurs ainsi que les chercheurs et chercheuses avec un intérêt particulier pour les études sociojuridiques ainsi que les perspectives interdisciplinaires ou pluralistes à participer à cette conférence. Les échanges de même que la collaboration avec des étudiantes et étudiants de différentes disciplines sont les bienvenus et même fortement encouragés. 

Thématique :

Si, d’un point de vue historique, le droit s’est imposé comme un ordre de contraintes sur la personne et la société afin de légitimer ou interdire des normes de comportement, le rôle et l’effectivité de la contrainte se sont adaptés aux transformations de la société. Ainsi, en proposant le thème « Droit et contraintes », nous encourageons les étudiants et étudiantes à réfléchir aux différentes manifestations et transformations de la contrainte en droit, mais également sur le droit.

Nous invitons les étudiants et étudiantes à appréhender la contrainte dans ses différentes dimensions, par exemple la contrainte physique inhérente au corps humain et l’auto-contrainte, la contrainte-sanction qu’un agent exerce sur un autre agent ou encore la contrainte structurelle, qui limite, encadre et détermine les actions possibles des agents.

Le CRDS convie les étudiants et étudiantes à se saisir de l’une ou de plusieurs des questions suivantes, sans toutefois s’y limiter:

➔      De quelles manières les contraintes se manifestent-elles dans votre sujet de recherche?

➔      Quel est le rôle de la contrainte en droit? Est-elle limitative ou habilitante?

➔      Quelles sont les contraintes qui s’exercent sur le droit? Quelles sont les adaptations ou les résistances qui en découlent?

➔      De quelle manière la contrainte - institutionnelle, économique, sociale ou épistémique - se vit-elle dans la recherche en droit?

Format de soumission

Nous invitons les étudiants et étudiantes de même que les chercheurs et chercheures à envoyer un résumé (jusqu’à 250 mots) à David DesBaillets (en anglais) ou Valériane Thool (en français), à crds.uqam@gmail.com avant minuit le 31 juillet 2017. Veuillez indiquer vos nom, affiliations, coordonnées et cinq mots clés qui décrivent la nature de votre recherche. De plus, veuillez nous informer de votre niveau de compréhension du français et de l’anglais (il n’est pas requis que les participants soient bilingues). Les propositions seront révisées par les pairs.

Les communications retenues devront être envoyées avant le 5 novembre 2017, afin qu’elles puissent être lues par les autres participants. Les textes seront tous considérés pour publication.

Les panels seront organisés en fonction des intérêts des participants et participantes. Veuillez également indiquer les informations nécessaires si vous souhaitez co-présenter votre communication (nom, affiliations et coordonnées du co-présentateur, de la co-présentatrice).

Le Comité organisateur du CRDS

 

Contemporary Challenges in Constitutional Theory-University of Liverpool

Tue, 2017-04-04 11:31 -- manager

Please find attached call for papers for an upcoming workshop, to be held by the School of Law and Social Justice, University of Liverpool, on 19th-20th June 2017.

The theme of the workshop is ’Contemporary Challenges in Constitutional Theory’. We hope to provide a valuable opportunity for those researching in constitutional theory to receive feedback on their work from an assembled panel of experts, chaired by Professor Neil Walker, Regius Professor of Public Law and the Law of Nature and Nations, University of Edinburgh. We also invite submissions from those who would not necessarily identify as ‘theorists’, but feel they might benefit from feedback on a particular theoretical element of a work in progress.

The deadline for submissions is 30th April.

CANADA 150+ : THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF INDIGENOUS POLITICAL TRADITIONS TO CONFEDERATION

Mon, 2017-03-27 15:20 -- manager

CANADA 150+ : THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF INDIGENOUS POLITICAL TRADITIONS TO CONFEDERATION

University of New Brunswick Peace and Friendship Treaty Days 2017

Colloquium – October 23-24, 2017

Fredericton Campus, University of New Brunswick

2017 is the 150th anniversary of the passage of the British North America Act (now known as the Constitution Act, 1867) which united two British colonies in the Maritimes with the colony of Canada. The dominant story of Confederation begins with a meeting of colonial delegates in Charlottetown, PEI in September of 1864, originally to discuss the union of the Maritime colonies; this meeting was followed by a conference in Quebec City in October of 1864 and a meeting of colonial delegates with British officials in London in December of 1866. In the dominant story, Canadian Confederation is the 150-year-old creation of a number of white, male delegates of the colonies and white, male British government officials.

The 150th anniversary of the legal creation of the political community we know as Canada is certainly worthy of celebration, but Canadian Confederation is neither merely 150 years old nor is it solely the creation of white colonists. The roots of Confederation rest in the nourishing soil of Indigenous political traditions of confederacies, including the Wabanaki Confederacy, and were fed by the tradition of treaty-making between Indigenous nations and the British Crown. The Peace and Friendship Treaties between the British Crown and the nations of the Wabanaki Confederacy were among the earliest of these treaties. As well, despite the efforts of federal governments since Confederation to make Indigenous peoples invisible in Canada’s political community through assimilationist policies, the resilience of Indigenous peoples has meant that Indigenous political traditions continue to influence the evolution of the Canadian political community today.

On this, the 150th anniversary of the passage of the British North America Act, the Mi’kmaq-Wolastoqey Centre at the University of New Brunswick will hold a colloquium as part of the University of New Brunswick’s 3rd annual Peace and Friendship Treaty Days. We are seeking the submission of abstracts for papers and proposals for panels to address topics related to the role of Indigenous political traditions and treaty-making, especially among the Wabanaki nations, in providing the inspiration and foundation for the creation and evolution of the Confederation of the British North American colonies from 1867 to today.

Part of the purpose of Peace and Friendship Treaty Days is to raise awareness of the Peace and Friendship Treaties among New Brunswick political and social leaders, government officials, and New Brunswick citizens generally, as part of educating all New Brunswickers about the treaties; papers and panels should therefore be aimed at this broader audience. We also intend to publish a selection of papers based on the presentations as a follow-up to the colloquium.

Abstracts should be approximately 250 words and should be sent to treatydays@unb.ca by June 30, 2017.  We look forward to your submissions.

Call for Papers for Mexico City meeting with LSA June 20-23, 2017

Fri, 2016-11-11 16:34 -- manager
Re. Call for Papers for Mexico City meeting with LSA June 20-23, 2017
 
We are pleased to announce that we are able to entertain a limited number of additional proposals for papers and panels to be presented at the CLSA’s annual meeting in Mexico City in June 2017. 
 
If you are interested, please do the following:
 
1) By November 21, send Nicole O’Byrne (nobyrne@unb.ca) a Word document for your paper or panel that contains the following information: 

1. Title
2. Author(s)— for panels, distinguish between presenting and non-presenting co-authors 
3. Abstract (minimum 1500 characters for complete panels —the system won’t accept anything less)
4. Keyword selection (Primary keyword should be Canadian Law and Society, secondary should come from this list: http://www.lawandsociety.org/MexicoCity2017/2017-keywords.html)

2) Each presenter must also set up a profile in the LSA systemhttps://ww2.aievolution.com/lsa1701/index.cfm?do=att.newSpkProfile. The panel can’t be entered into the system unless each presenter already has a profile set up. 

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