Call for Papers and Conferences

Call for Papers: The State of Abolitionism Today - A special issue edited by Nicolas Carrier and Justin Piché

Wed, 2013-10-30 12:17 -- manager

 

CHAMP PÉNAL/PENAL FIELD

Appel à contributions/Call for papers

champpenal.revues.org

 

The State of Abolitionism Today

A special issue edited by Nicolas Carrier and Justin Piché

 

Numerous analysts of the penal field have criticized the intensification of punishment experienced in most liberal democracies in the western world.  Dubbed the ‘punitive turn’ by some, contemporary penal policies and practices are contrasted to those of a supposed less punitive past characterized by an ethic of care for the criminalized. Recent discussions on the topic have led some scholars, notably in Anglophone debates, to call for a ‘public criminology’ or the advancement of more robust ‘public’ critiques of penal intensification with the goal of making penal politics more effective, useful, rational and humane. What is the place of abolitionist thought and action in this context? What arguments and actors support such work? In what ways is abolitionism relevant, if at all? This special issue of Champ pénal/Penal Field sets out to assess the state of abolitionism today.

 

The many targets of abolitionism

Analysts of the penal field tend to identify three targets of abolitionism: the prison and the industrial complex in which it operates, the penal system, and the diffusion of carceral controls in society more generally. Abolitionist thought and action also focuses on specific issues such as the criminalization of certain drugs, sex work, migration and political dissent against the State. Contributions to this special issue can address any of the multiple issues addressed in abolitionist work and could also explore the implications of the presence of multiple targets for activism, research and intellectual work.  

 

Drivers of and motives for action

This special issue aims to showcase diverse perspectives on how ‘justice’ is conceptualized and experienced, and how these inform contemporary abolitionist work. Why abolitionism? Because imprisonment, being subjected to carceral control, and punishment is unjust? In what ways? Is it sufficient to document the effects of institutionalized responses to problematized situations as many have done in regards to the prison? Is it necessary that facts inform our conception of justice? Is this possible and/or desirable? Are the drivers of and motives for taking an abolitionist stance stable in time and space, anchored in long-established traditions of thinking and acting, or is renewal underway?  

 

Strategies and alternatives

What alternative ways of conceptualizing and responding to criminalized conflicts and harms characterize abolitionist work today?  On what grounds do we oppose a penal system that claims to be in the business of justice? What lessons can be learned from past abolitionist efforts? How does abolitionism position itself vis-à-vis less radical approaches such as penal minimalism? How do abolitionists respond to the critique that there will always be a ‘dangerous few’ who need to be controlled and imprisoned? Does engaging in the ‘de-ontologization’ of dangerousness suffice? What are the similarities and differences between abolitionism, restorative justice, transformative justice and social justice? Does abolitionism imply anarchism, or can it be envisioned within State sovereignty?  How is a world without punishment imagined or practiced? Are the kinds of social relations required to involve those most impacted when addressing conflicts and harms promoted by abolitionists possible in a globalized context characterized by social distance? What is an abolitionist response to ‘war crimes’ and ‘crimes against humanity’? Is abolitionism, like criminology, a domestically driven endeavour? In the context of a global lockdown and expanding surveillance in western democracies, abolitionist arguments have been characterized as utopian – is this the case?  And if so, is this a problem?

 

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Bilingualism

Proposed contributions can be submitted in English or in French.  To reach as broad of a readership as possible, we are striving towards a bilingual collection and authors whose works are accepted for publication are encouraged, but not obligated, to translate their papers.

 

Submission guidelines

The word count for papers is between 8,000 and 15,000 words.  The articles must also conform (!) with the submission guidelines of the journal, which can be found at http://champpenal.revues.org/7625

 

Article submissions

An abstract outlining your proposed contribution must be submitted no later than March 1, 2014.  The submission deadline for completed papers is September 1, 2014.  In both cases, please send your correspondence to the following addresses:

nicolas_carrier@carleton.ca

justin.piche@uottawa.ca

 

Another invitation …

We invite those interested in contributing to this special issue to present a preliminary version of their papers at the Fourth Conference – Critical Perspectives: Criminology and Social Justice to be held June 11 and 12, 2014 at Carleton University or at the Fifteenth International Conference on Penal Abolition to be held June 13 to 15, 2014 at the University of Ottawa.  Both universities are located on Algonquin Territory / in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.  For more information, please visit http://www.actionicopa.org or write to Justin or Nicolas.

 

Nicolas Carrier

Institute of Criminology & Criminal Justice

Carleton University

CANADA

nicolas_carrier@carleton.ca

Justin Piché

Department of Criminology

University of Ottawa

CANADA

justin.piche@uottawa.ca

 

 

 

The Canadian Journal of Human Rights - 2014 Call for Papers

Tue, 2013-10-01 16:42 -- manager
Call for Papers
Deadline for Submissions: Dec 30th, 2013
 
The Canadian Journal of Human Rights (CJHR), the only academic journal of its kind in Canada, is now accepting submissions for its next volume.
 
The CJHR is published by the Robson Hall Faculty of Law at the University of Manitoba; however, it is not a typical law journal. The journal is both a national and international forum for scholars to share and debate ideas in human rights and humanitarian law and policy. It is the only journal in Canada that deals exclusively with human rights scholarship. 
 
As developments in the area of human rights are not limited to legal events and analyses, the CJHR has an interdisciplinary focus and will publish quality papers that deal with human rights issues in a broader socio-legal arena. There is no requirement that submissions have a strict legal focus.
 
The CJHR welcomes submissions from scholars from diverse backgrounds of academic engagement. Manuscripts may be submitted in English or French.
Please see our web site at www.cjhr.ca for specific manuscript requirements and further information. Kindly send submissions via e-mail as attachments in Word to:
Dr. Donn Short, Editor-in-Chief, Canadian Journal of Human Rights editor_cjhr@umanitoba.ca
 
Authors should include full contact information (name, institution, mailing address, telephone) in the body of the e-mail.
 
Deadline for submissions is December 30th, 2013.

Call for Conference Proposals - Centaur Jurisprudence: the Legalization of Culture and the Enculturation of Law

Mon, 2013-06-10 16:11 -- manager

Call for Conference Proposals

Centaur Jurisprudence:
The Legalization of Culture and the Enculturation of Law
McGill Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism
Montréal - Friday 21 February 2014

Many claims to justice ask law to be responsive to the lived experiences of those to and through whom it is applied. “Culture” is one label attached to collective forms of this lived experience. But what does it mean for courts and other legal institutions to be culturally sensitive? What are the institutional implications and consequences of such an aspiration? To what extent is legal discourse capable of accommodating multiple cultural narratives without losing its claim to normative specificity? And how are we to understand meetings of law and culture in the context of formal legal processes, such as when a criminal defendant invokes the acceptability of domestic violence within his ethnic community, when oral traditions are presented as the basis for an aboriginal land claim, or when the custom of ‘bush marriage’ is evoked as relevant to the prosecution of the war crime of rape?  A traditional approach to law anchored in positivism tends to construct the encounter between law and cultures as one of subjugation: cultural practices are vetted to assess compatibility with existing legal rules. Cultural anthropology would see a more horizontal interplay of practices and symbols, with law constituting just one more cultural field. As such, law and cultural anthropology would seem to correspond to different ways of imagining the world, to distinct epistemes. However, legal pluralism, rejecting a narrow focus on formal law and state institutions, offers a vision of law as dynamic and inherently open to “culture”.  This one-day conference] will explore the potential of legal pluralism to account for the varied and dynamic roles of culture within legal discourse Can legal pluralism create a richer model of legal knowledge, one that reflects plural cultural narratives, while still offering a normative foundation for formal legal processes? Or does it entail abandoning a distinctively legal discourse in favour of an assemblage of anthropological and legal knowledge or “centaur discipline”? In short, can legal pluralism bring culture within the domain of law? Four panels will explore these questions from a multidisciplinary perspective in the context of international law, aboriginal law, alternative dispute resolution, and the recognition/accommodation of minority cultural practices. A fuller description of the Centaur Jurisprudence Project is available here.

Paper proposals must be between 300-500 words in length and should be accompanied by a short resume. Please submit your documents to centaur.conference@gmail.com. Any query may be directed to the conference convener, Professor René Provost (rene.provost@mcgill.ca).

 

The closing date for submissions is 15 July 2013. We will notify successful applicants by early August

2013.  An initial 3-5 page sketch of the paper must be submitted by 1 November 2013 for circulation among panellists and feedback from the conference committee. Presenters must submit a draft paper by 15 January 2014, ahead of the conference on 21 February 2014. Final papers should be between 5,000 and 10,000 words. Selected submissions will be considered for publication in an edited volume on the conference theme.

 

Airfare and accommodation of presenters will be covered by the conference organizers.

Graduate Student Essay Prize

Sun, 2013-02-24 21:32 -- manager

The CLSA is proud to announce a Graduate Student Essay Prize to complement our Book Prize and our award for the best article published in the Canadian Journal of Law and Society.  

This prize will be adjudicated by leading law and society scholars and the winning essay will be published in a fortcoming issue of the Canadian Journal of Law and Society.

The prize is open to all graduate students (MA, LLM, PhD, SJD) studying socio-legal issues at any Canadian University.  

To apply please send your paper in doc. or pff form to [email address]

Deadline: XX Month 2013

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