Call for Papers and Conferences

ASSOCIATION FOR LAW, PROPERTY & SOCIETY 6TH ANNUAL MEETING

Wed, 2014-10-15 17:31 -- manager

Association for Law, Property & Society 6th Annual Meeting

University of Georgia School of Law, Athens, Georgia USA

May 1-2, 2015

Call for Papers

 

The Association for Law, Property & Society (ALPS) is a scholarly organization for those engaged in scholarship on all aspects of property law and society.  Its annual meeting brings together scholars from many disciplines to discuss their work and to foster dialogue among those working in property law, policy, and theory. Prior meetings have averaged 150 participants, many coming from outside North America.

ALPS will hold its 6th Annual Meeting at the University of Georgia School of Law, Athens, Georgia USA, May 1-2, 2015.

We welcome papers on any subject related to property law, including pedagogy, and from a diversity of perspectives. As in previous years, we will have both draft paper panels and early works-in-progress panels dedicated to brainstorming scholarship at its beginning stages. We also plan to support early-career scholars in their development and in connecting to mentors through the conference events.

You may submit an individual paper or a panel (usually 4 presenters). Panel proposals may include a collection of paper presentations, roundtables, or book panels. Paper abstracts should not exceed 250 words. If submitting a panel, please submit a panel abstract and individual paper abstracts.

Registration and paper/panel submission is available through the conference website at http://www.alps.syr.edu

The deadline for submitting papers and panels is February 1, 2015, but registration for the conference will continue to be available after that date. Please do not submit papers and panels after February 1 as part of your registration without having emailed Jim Smith, jim@uga.edu for permission to submit late. We will do our best to accommodate late submission requests, but can only guarantee that proposals submitted by the February 1 deadline will be able to be considered for the conference.

A discounted early registration rate of $150 is available until February 1, 2015. After that date, the registration rate is $180. The registration rate for full-time students (JD, PhD, or other program) is $50.

In addition, in recognition of the international and interdisciplinary diversity of ALPS members, we invite paper or panel submissions relating to the following special themes:

·         Eviction and Displacement

·         Law and Geography

 

We will cluster papers and panels submitted in connection with these themes in such manner as to allow conference participants to attend all panels organized around each theme.

The standard length of each session will be 90 minutes and we expect sessions to include time for questions and discussion from the audience as well as presentation.

 

 

Australian and New Zealand Critical Criminology Conference

Mon, 2014-06-16 19:10 -- manager

CALL FOR PAPERS

The 8th Annual Australian and New Zealand Critical Criminology Conference

Thursday 4th - Friday 5th December 2014 at the Monash Law Chambers, 555 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne, Victoria

Abstract submissions are now being accepted for the 8th Annual Australian and New Zealand Critical Criminology Conference hosted by Monash University, to be held in Melbourne on 4-5 December 2014.

The theme of the conference is Critical Criminology: Research Praxis and Social Transformation in a Global EraThe conference will bring together academics, cross-sector stakeholders, legal practitioners, advocates, activists and students to reflect and renew discussions about the status and future of critical criminology. The conference will consider the unique and important place of critical criminology, with a particular focus on the multi-level barriers that impact on transformative research agendas and collaborations in the current social, political and economic climate.

The conference streams include:

1. Re-theorizing Punishment’s Borders and Boundaries

2. Movements against State and Corporate Harm

3. Seeking Real Access to Justice

4. The Prospects of, and Limits Placed Upon, Transformative Justice

5. Campaigns for Justice

6. Surveillance and the Technologies of Control

7. From Theory to Praxis: Challenges in Critical Criminology

Abstracts for individual/co-authored papers and themed panel submissions are encouraged.

Please note: Abstracts will subject to a process of peer-review and not all abstracts may be accepted. Abstracts should be received on or before Monday 30 June 2014.

The organisers also welcome expressions of interest for those wishing to launch a new publication or research initiative at the conference. If you have something you would like to launch, please contact the conference organisers at: criticalcriminology@monash.edu

Our Keynote Plenary Panels feature the following speakers:

Panel One: Critical Research and Institutional Violence

Professor Phil Scraton (Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland); Dr Elizabeth Stanley (Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand) and Dr Thalia Anthony (University of Technology Sydney, Australia)

Panel Two: Regulation and Online Cultures

Associate Professor Thomas Crofts (University of Sydney, Australia); Associate Professor Murray Lee (University of Sydney, Australia) and Professor Gail Mason (University of Sydney, Australia)

Panel Three: Punishment, Otherness and Morality

Dr Anna Eriksson (Monash University, Australia); Professor Harry Blagg (University of Western Australia) and Dr Claire Spivakovsky (Monash University, Australia)

Panel Four: Anti-State Research and the Politics of Containment: What Can Radical Criminology Say and Do?

Professor Scott Poynting (University of Auckland, New Zealand); Dr Vicki Sentas (University of New South Wales, Australia) and Dr Mike Grewcock (University of New South Wales, Australia)

For information on the conference and to submit an abstract, please visit:

http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/critical-criminology/

For further information please email: criticalcriminology@monash.edu

Canadian Journal of Disability Studies Special Issue on Law, Religion and Disability

Thu, 2014-05-29 15:42 -- manager
Call for proposals: “Law, Religion and Disability”
Special Issue of the Canadian Journal of Disability Studies
 
The relationship of law, religion and disability is complex, emerging and still in development as a research area. Scholarship on religion and disability has included feminist reflections regarding religion and disability (e.g. Minister 2013) and analysis of the physical isolation that can result in congregations where accommodations are made but without reflection on the communal aspects of integration (Eiesland 1994). Further, health care providers working with disabled individuals negotiate and navigate their own religious identities in their professional sphere (Bray, Egan and Beagan 2012). Legal advancement within the disability movement has produced results such as the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act. Public and policy challenges remain highly contested and disability advocates reflect on the limitations of existing policy as well as the challenge of the application of these policies (e.g. Prince 2012; Johner 2013).
 
We are seeking articles that articulate the diverse perspectives of disability studies as it relates both to law and religion. There are multiple ways the religion, law and disability intersect with one another. The special issue intends to explore overlapping themes in dialogue to reflect on the current discourse about disability, disabled identities and its interconnections with law and religion.
 
Possible topics can include, but are not limited to:
  • What social, cultural or religious norms have created exclusive or inclusive environments? E.g. What constraints might the Quebec Charter of Values have created for individuals at the intersection of religion and disabled identities?
  • Religious individuals and organizations face challenges regarding the theological debates regarding inclusivity versus exclusivity in the accommodation of disabled individuals. What are some of the challenges of negotiating theological doctrine and what are the nuances made possible through theology regarding disability? 
  • How is disability taught or not taught, in schools or within religious institutions? What are the policies in the education system regarding disability and what challenges are ongoing regarding education and disability?
  • How do religious organizations and law respond to disability within a health framework? What challenges are faced by healthcare workers who are religiously identified or disabled? In what ways are religion, law and disability or disabled identities negotiated?
 
We welcome submissions from across the disciplines of law, religious studies and disability studies, as well as submissions from outside those fields. Proposals should be no more than 2 pages in length (single spaced) and should include: theoretical and methodological approach; central thesis or argument; and data used within article (i.e. legislation, doctrine). Proposals must be submitted to Ravi Malhotra (Ravi.Malhotra@uottawa.ca) and Heather Shipley (hshipley@uottawa.ca) by September 30, 2014. Notifications will be sent out by November 15, 2014 and final submissions will be due January 30, 2015. Full articles should be between 6,000-7,000 words, using the Turabian style guide (16th Edition) or another recognized citation style. All final articles will be subject to the peer-review process. Publication is conditional on reviewer reports. As per Canadian Journal of Disability Studies policies, all methods and methodologies and disciplines are welcome, as are submissions in French or English. This CFP additionally invites perspectives on religion from across traditions, and legal perspectives from outside of Canada or North America
 

REINVIGORATING SOCIOLEGAL RESEARCH – APPROACHES THAT INVOLVE UNDERGRADUATES

Tue, 2014-03-18 16:03 -- manager
REINVIGORATING SOCIOLEGAL RESEARCH – APPROACHES THAT INVOLVE UNDERGRADUATES
 
The Consortium of Undergraduate Law and Justice Programs (CULJP) invites interested scholars to participate in a workshop this July to refresh and reinforce sociolegal research, especially that involving undergraduates.
 
With support from the National Science Foundation, CULJP will be hosting a workshop to help identify and advance the next wave of research questions in four key subfields of sociolegal studies and to expand the involvement of undergraduates in this research. Those subfields include legal consciousness, legal mobilization, cause lawyering, and judicial decision making.
 
In addition to presentations and moderated discussion, participating scholars with shared interests will be paired with one another to provide suggestions, constructive criticism, and encouragement as they hone potential research projects. Time also will be set aside for participants to consider and begin planning possible future research experiences for undergraduates (REU) that, with additional organizing, might be submitted to the National Science Foundation for support.
 
The workshop, which will involve 30 sociolegal scholars, will take place July 21-22, 2014 at the offices of the National Science Foundation in Arlington, Virginia. Participants’ travel expenses will be covered.
 
Interested faculty are invited to apply to participate. Scholars should send no more than a two-page summary describing their current research agenda, what larger issues they would like to tackle in future work, and how they believe they would benefit from participating in the workshop. Please submit this summary and a current CV to alorenz@ramapo.edu by April 18. Those selected will be notified by May 12.
 
Please direct any questions to gould@american.edu. The organizers are especially interested in reaching scholars at under-served sociolegal undergraduate programs, particularly those whose institutional support for research has declined recently.

Educating Justice: Post-Secondary Education in the Justice Disciplines

Thu, 2014-02-27 17:02 -- manager

Call for Papers

Educating Justice: Post-secondary Education in the Justice Disciplines

Educating Justice is the theme for this year’s conference hosted by the Centre for Interdisciplinary Justice Studies (CIJS) at the Department of Criminal Justice, The University of Winnipeg, May 8-10, 2014.

We call for papers that explore the development and current organization of criminal justice (CJ) and social justice studies programs at universities in Canada and which place such developments in the context of the growth of related fields in North America. The development of post-secondary CJ programs in Canada is an understudied phenomenon and even fewer reflections have been published on crossovers with other justice studies programs. The CIJS 2014 conference will create a record of and debate about the development of justice studies in Canada.

Our conference theme is shaped by our own experiences at the University of Winnipeg (UW). The CJ program at UW began as an interdisciplinary major. Over time, our CJ faculty attempted to build a program that was theoretically oriented while not losing sight of its applied roots. The development of the UW program highlights key tensions underlying the growth of CJ programs in Canada today. The journey can best be described as a mitigation of the protective services orientation (Frauley 2005) – a pejorative description of CJ leveled by critical scholars of crime, law and society. The literature portrays the development of these programs as descendants of applied criminology or as handmaidens to the state (Chunn and Menzies 1999; Frauley 2005; Menzies and Chunn 2006). Yet there is considerable diversity in programs across the country.

We wish to open dialogue about the nature of CJ education as well as justice and education more generally in Canada.

We invite session and paper submissions representing criminological, economic, political, historical, legal, feminist, and philosophical insights into education and justice; professional reflections and research on justice and education as well as pedagogy; area-based uses of justice such as social justice, restorative justice, ecological justice, urban justice, human rights, and reflections on the problems and potentials of justice education and crossover in the classroom. We are keen to receive session and paper submissions that reflect on the creation of justice studies and criminal justice studies departments, institutes, curricula, and programing in Canada or elsewhere and the challenges associated with such endeavours. We welcome session and paper submissions from scholars of all disciplinary backgrounds, students, community organizations, justice professionals and researchers, artists, activists and anyone who wishes to engage in an intellectual conversation on justice education.

We are particularly interested in sessions and papers that examine the justice disciplines at other Canadian post-secondary institutions. We take a broad view of what constitutes the justice disciplines and encourage submissions from scholars involved with programs in criminal justice, justice studies, criminology, socio-legal studies, and other allied disciplines with a scholarly focus on justice. We would also like to see submissions on social justice studies programs, including on recent closures of such educational sites.

 

Proposals for papers, panels or other submissions must be received no later than March 26. You can submit proposals at cijs.ca or to s.kohm@uwinnipeg.ca.

 Proposals must include:

  • mailing address, e-mail, phone number, and affiliation for each participant
  • abstract of not more than 500 words for sessions
  • abstract of not more than 250 words for individual paper presentations

 

Vist the http://cijs.ca/ website for more information.

 

Judicial Education and the Art of Judging: From Myth to Methodology

Mon, 2014-02-24 12:10 -- manager

The University of Missouri is issuing a call for proposals for an upcoming works-in-progress conference as well as a call for papers for a student writing competition.  Both of these calls are affiliated with a symposium that is being convened at the University of Missouri's Center for the Study of Dispute Resolution on Friday, October 10, 2014.

 

The symposium is entitled "Judicial Education and the Art of Judging:  From Myth to Methodology" and addresses a number of issues relating to the role of judges and the goals and methods of judicial education.  The symposium features the Honorable Duane Benton of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit as keynote speaker as well as an accomplished group of judges, academics, and judicial education experts from the United States and Canada as panelists.

 

The day before the symposium (Thursday, October 9, 2014), the University of Missouri will be hosting a works-in-progress conference relating to the subject matter of the symposium, broadly interpreted.  Presentation proposals should be no more than one page in length and can include analyses that are practical, theoretical or interdisciplinary in nature.  Participants can discuss judges at the state, federal or international level.  Proposals for the works-in-progress conference should be directed to Professor S.I. Strong (strongsi@missouri.edu) and will be accepted until May 26, 2014.  Decisions regarding accepted papers will be made in June 2014.  Prospective attendees should note that there is no funding available to assist participants with their travel expenses. 

 

The University of Missouri is also organizing a student writing competition in association with the symposium.  Papers will likely be due in August 2014, although precise details (such as the due date and the amount of any prize money associated with the competition) are still being finalized.

 

More information about the symposium, works-in-progress conference and student writing competition is available at the symposium website, located at: http://www.law.missouri.edu/csdr/symposium/2014.  People may also contact Professor S.I. Strong (strongsi@missouri.edu) with any questions.

 

Call for Submissions for the 7th Annual Toronto Group Conference

Thu, 2014-02-20 16:25 -- manager

 

Call for Submissions for the 7th Annual Toronto Group Conference

 

We are pleased to invite graduate students to present their work at the 7th Annual Conference of the Toronto Group for the study of International, Transnational and Comparative Law (TG). The TG is a collaborative project between graduate students at Osgoode Hall Law School and the Faculty of Law at the University of Toronto.

 

The theme of the conference is Conflicting Legal Orders; it will be held in Toronto, Ontario on Friday, May 2, 2014 at Osgoode Hall Law School.

 

Theme of the Conference

 

Legal orders are prone to a variety of conflicts: from conflicts within local systems of law, such as through vigilante justice and social protest movements, to conflicts between supranational legal orders and national or sub-national jurisdictions. These conflicts bring to the fore the inadequacy of law in resolving the question of how we should live together, in balance with our environments and within increasingly multicultural, cosmopolitan, and pluralist societies. It is time to get creative and devise new approaches, tools, and mechanisms that prevent and resolve both public and private conflicts that develop and rejuvenate international law, and that protect human rights and global security. It is the challenge of our generation to find ways in which law can evolve to support the resolution of violent conflicts and to help ensure a more sustainable world enriched by our differences.

 

We encourage participants to interpret legal orders broadly, and invite papers that explore a wide range of issues in this context. Topics can include legal orders relating to humanitarian law, human rights, criminal law, and international law generally, and any intersections with multiculturalism, pluralism, or religion. The institutionalization of law and the use of specialized tribunals can be a relevant area, as well as the role of civil society, technology and social media. Foreign policy, national security, terrorism, and cyber wars, are all areas where conflicts can occur. In redress of such issues, conflict resolution theory, processes, and their implications for law could be of relevance. These topics are certainly not exhaustive, and participants are encouraged to share unique perspectives and interpretation.

 

Submitting your work

 

We look forward to receiving your 250-word abstract on or before March 14 via email to torontogroupconference@gmail.com with the subject line “TG2014Submission”.

 

Applicants will be notified if their conference submission has been accepted by March 21.

 

Please note that given our limited funding, we are unable to cover any travel or accommodation costs.

 

For more information about the Toronto Group, conference and accommodation options in Toronto, visit our website http://torontogroup.wordpress.com

OSI 2014 - International Osnabrück Summer Institute on the Cultural Study of the Law

Thu, 2014-02-20 15:48 -- manager

*Contested Properties: Culture, Rights and the Humanities*

International Osnabrück Summer Institute on the Cultural Study of the Law

http://www.osi.uni-osnabrueck.de/

*Invitation*

The fifth International Osnabrück Summer Institute on the Cultural Study of the Law will be held from August 4 to 16, 2014, at the University of Osnabrück, Germany. Hosted by the Institute of English and American Studies (IfAA), the Osnabrück Summer Institute seeks to bring together advanced graduate, doctoral, and postdoctoral students of the humanities and/or the law from around the world to promote and examine the interdisciplinary study and research of law and culture.

During the two week program, students will partake in a unique experience of scholarly collaboration and exchange through workshops, public lectures, panel discussions, excursions and a final symposium. Participating faculty in this year's Summer Institute include:

* Rosemary J. Coombe (York University, Toronto)
* Helle Porsdam (University of Copenhagen)
* Fiona Macmillan (Birkbeck School of Law, University of London)
* Karen-Margrethe Simonsen (Aarhus U)
* Joseph Slaughter (Columbia U)
* Leti Volpp (U of California, Berkeley)

with more faculty to be announced in the upcoming weeks.

The Institute will offer a total of four workshops for 20-30 international participants (doctoral, post-doctoral and advanced M.A. – see below for eligibility) over a two-week period. The first workshop will be concerned with basic theories, concepts and perspectives within the emerging field of cultural legal studies, focusing specifically on the range and potential of interdisciplinary studies and approaches. The remaining three workshops will focus on key areas of critical inquiry that have been central to the dynamic development of the field:

* The tripartite relationship between culture, cultural rights, and the nation state
* The historical development and current debates about culture as heritage, property and as a resource and its legal definition and regulation (including concepts such as copyright, intellectual property and authorship)
* The cultural presence and representation of the law and the role of culture in the representation and dissemination of the concept of rights (e.g. law and literature, life writing and human rights, visual culture and rights rhetoric)

*Participant Eligibility*

The Summer Institute aims at advanced graduate, doctoral, and postdoctoral students from various academic fields whose research interests and projects are situated at the interface between law and the humanities and who are concerned with a better understanding of the interdependence of law and culture.
Even though the Institute strongly invites students from a broad variety of disciplines and academic backgrounds, it focuses almost exclusively on questions and issues related to research done in the humanities and legal studies.
Doctoral candidates in literature, the law, the arts, the humanities, and the related social sciences are invited to apply, as are advanced students pursuing a J.D. or its equivalent (such as the L.L.B). Young scholars or junior faculty members who have received a Ph.D. or corresponding degree in the last five years are also eligible. While applications by doctoral/post-doctoral students are prioritized, the Summer Institute also encourages applications from advanced Master students about to conclude their studies and with a strong interest in interdisciplinary research. There are openings for 20-30 students to participate in the Summer Institute.
Due to its international audience, the Summer Institute will be completely conducted in English. It does not offer language instruction classes, either in German or in English.

*Application Process*

Applicants should complete:

* The application form on our website

There, they will have to upload
* A statement of purpose no more than two pages long, describing current scholarly interests, current research, and a short statement on how the Summer Institute would specifically further said interests and research.
* A curriculum vitae.

Advanced Masters students and graduate students (PhD and post-doc) interested in taking part in the Summer Institute should submit their applications no later than March 15, 2014. Detailed information about the Institute, the workshops, international faculty, admission and fees can be found at:

http://www.osi.uni-osnabrueck.de/

*Questions*

Please direct all inquiries and questions to Dr. Sabine N. Meyer, the coordinator of the Osnabrück Summer Institute, at

lawandculture@uos.de

The International Journal of Migration and Border Studies: Call for Papers – Issue (2014) : 2

Sun, 2014-02-09 17:03 -- manager

The International Journal of Migration and Border Studies

Call for Papers – Issue (2014) : 2

Editor in Chief

Prof. France Houle, Université de Montréal, Canada Email: ijmbs.editor@gmail.com

The International Journal of Migration and Border Studies (IJMBS) is pleased to announce a call for papers for its second issue of 2014.

IJMBS aims to bring together a diverse range of scholars and practitioners to advance knowledge and improve practice and methodologies in a broad range of issued related to migration and borders studies. Broadly speaking, it seeks to provide different perspectives to its readership ranging from exclusion to integration of permanent, temporary and irregular migrants as well as asylum seekers. Articles covering a large spectrum of topics addressing the development of international, transnational and national immigration policies viewed in a broad sense are welcome. What could be the best practices regarding inclusion? Which measures have exclusionary effects? Some examples of themes this journal intends to cover are listed below.

Subject Coverage

Broad themes on which articles are sought include but are not limited to:

  • Innovations in institutional, procedural and social arrangements to deal with border security and immigration policy

  • Personal information databases and exchanges

  • Measures to restrict access to asylum

  • The coherence and coordination between various actors dealing with issues such as health, education,

    social welfare, employment and law enforcement in the migration context

  • Causes and consequences (economic, social, political, environmental, etc.) of migration and their legal and

    policy implications

  • Local, regional and international mechanisms and logics that transform political and media discourses,

    norms, policies and practices related to migration and border studies

  • Development of new priorities for immigration programmes

  • The role of gender, age, social status, ability, race and other factors in curtailing border and immigration

    policies

  • Indigenous rights and claims and border and migration studies

    IJMBS is a peer-reviewed journal which offers a forum for disciplinary and inter-disciplinary research concerning conceptual, theoretical, empirical and methodological dimensions related to key concepts that underpin them: borders, immigration and integration policies, humanitarianism, sovereignty, states, citizenship, etc. Such critical analysis contributes to a better understanding of current challenges from different disciplinary perspectives including law, sociology, anthropology, social policy and social welfare, criminology, political economy, political science and public politics.

    The journal invites submissions from both emerging and established scholars, including graduate students, post- graduates, professors and practitioners from around the globe, with the objective of ensuring that a plurality of experiences and perspectives is represented.

    Notes for Prospective Authors

    Submitted papers should not have been previously published nor be currently under consideration for publication elsewhere. (N.B. Conference papers may only be submitted if the paper has been completely re-written and if appropriate written permissions have been obtained from any copyright holders of the original paper).

    All papers are refereed through a peer review process.
    All papers must be submitted online. Please read our 
    information on preparing and submitting articles.

    Important Date

    Submission deadline: 1st July, 2014 

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