Call for Papers and Conferences

Call for Submissions - 2016-The Quebec Journal of International Law-RQDI

Fri, 2016-02-05 11:12 -- manager

 

 

 

 

 

Call for Submissions - 2016

 

 

The Quebec Journal of International Law (RQDI: Revue québécoise de droit international) is seeking manuscripts for the preparation of its upcoming issues. Since its inception, the journal’s mission is to report on research and practice in the field of international law within the public, private and compared area, in French, English and Spanish. With this in mind, the journal publishes studies, notes and comments, and also some international jurisprudence that has influenced the practice of international law in Quebec and reviews of books on international law

                                                                                                                                     

The RQDI readership is made of academics, lawyers, legal practitioners and students from around the world. Law and public administration libraries as well as many Canadian, American and European universities, make up an important part of the institutional subscribers to the Journal. The RQDI is also a reference guide for companies, law firms and lawyers working in government agencies. In this perspective and in order to meet the international and diverse content needs of the Journal, the RQDI encourages contributions from academics, practitioners, policy makers, researchers and students to submit manuscripts in line with its mission.

 

The manuscripts submitted to the RQDI are subject to an anonymous and rigorous scientific evaluation through a peer review. The Reading Committee with the assistance of the Editorial management team ensures the scientific quality of all manuscripts published by the Journal.

 

The articles submitted to the reading committee should count a maximum of 12 000 words, excluding footnotes. The manuscripts should be submitted under a ". Doc or. Docx" format using Microsoft Word. The Journal has taken up the writing protocol of the Canadian Guide to Uniform Legal Citation, 8th Edition, and complies with the rules of the legislative drafting style of the RQDI, published by LexisNexis. In addition, the submissions must include a 300 words (max.) abstract written in English, French or Spanish.

 

Should you wish to submit a manuscript or contact our editorial board for further information, please send an email to redactionenchef@rqdi.org.

2016 Canadian Law and Society Association Annual Meeting-Réunion annuelle de l’Association canadienne Droit et Société (2016)

Sun, 2016-01-17 16:28 -- manager
2016 Canadian Law and Society Association Annual Meeting University of Calgary, Calgary, AB 85th Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences - Energizing Communities Call for Papers
 
The program committee of the Canadian Law and Society Association invites submissions for its Annual Conference to be held during the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of Calgary. The theme for Congress 2016, “Energizing Communities,” provides an excellent opportunity for law and society scholars to explore law’s place in community building and the fostering of pluralistic relationships. We welcome proposals for papers in any area of Law and Society and socio-legal scholarship. We encourage participants to submit suggestions for complete panels and roundtables. Panel organizers should include the following in their submissions: a thematic overview of no more than 500 words, abstracts for each paper (250 words or less), a title for the panel, a one page CV for each presenter and a suggested chair or discussant. Individual submissions are most welcome and should include the following: a title, an abstract (250 words or less) and a one page CV. Please indicate in your submission if you are willing to serve as a panel chair. We are open to having a number of panels that focus on particular themes such as legal history, religious freedom, gender & sexuality, law & technology and indigenous legal knowledge. It may be helpful for presenters to know that the CLSA conference will overlap with the Annual Conference of the Canadian Association of Law Teachers on May 30 & 31. There will be a number of events dedicated to graduate students. The conference keynote speaker will be Prof. John McLaren, Professor Emeritus, Faculty of Law, University of Victoria, who will deliver his address at the banquet on May 30. Professor McLaren served as the first Dean of the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Law.
 
Where: University of Calgary, Calgary, AB When: May 28-30, 2016 Deadline: January 31, 2016 Submission information: Please forward panel and paper proposals by email attachment to Nicole O’Byrne, CLSA Vice-President (Conferences) at clsacalgary2016@gmail.com. Please put your last name and the words “CLSA submission” in the subject line. Presenters must be members of the CLSA. They must also register for Congress and pay the Congress fees, including the society fee for the CLSA. Information about registration, accommodation and other Congress activities is available on the Congress website: http://congress2016.ca/
 
Réunion annuelle de l’Association canadienne Droit et Société (2016)
Université de Calgary, Calgary, Alberta Le 85e Congrès annuel des Sciences humaines : L’Énergie des communautés
 
Appel de communications
Le comité des programmes de l’ACDS vous invite à soumettre vos contributions en vue de sa Conférence annuelle qui aura lieu lors du Congrès des Sciences humaines 2016 à l’Université de Calgary. Le thème du Congrès 2016, L’Énergie des communautés, offre une excellente occasion d’explorer la place du droit dans le renforcement des collectivités et le pluralisme communautaire.
Toutes contributions relatives aux disciplines s’intéressant au droit et société, ainsi qu’aux recherches sociojuridiques sont bienvenues. L’Association encourage les participants à soumettre leurs contributions pour des présentations individuelles et des tables rondes. Les organisateurs de tables rondes doivent nous faire parvenir l’aperçu thématique (500 mots maximum), le résumé de chaque présentation (250 mots maximum), le titre de la table ronde, le curriculum vitae (1 page) de chaque orateur, ainsi que le nom d’une personne qu’on propose comme modérateur. Les propositions de présentations individuelles doivent inclurent : un titre, un résumé (250 mots maximum) et un curriculum vitae (1 page). Veuillez aussi indiquer si vous souhaitez siéger en tant que modérateur. L’ACDS accueille tout particulièrement les propositions pour des groupes de discussion portant sur des thèmes reliés à l’histoire juridique, la liberté de religion, le genre et la sexualité, le droit et la technologie, ainsi que les questions juridiques relatives aux autochtones.
Il pourrait s’avérer utile aux personnes qui présentent de savoir que la réunion annuelle de l’ACDS coïncide avec le Colloque annuel de l’Association canadienne des professeurs de droit, le 30-31 mai 2016. De nombreuses activités sont prévues pour les étudiants diplômés. Le professeur émérite John McLaren de la faculté de droit de l’Université de Victoria sera le conférencier principal. Professeur McLaren a été le premier doyen de la faculté de droit de l’Université de Calgary. Sa présentation aura lieu lors du banquet le 30 mai.
 
Lieu : Université de Calgary, Calgary, Alberta
Dates du Congrès : du 28-30 mai 2016
Échéancier : Le 31 janvier 2016
Format : Toutes les communications doivent être soumises en pièces jointes, par courrier électronique, à Nicole O’Byrne, vice-présidente (conférences) de l’ACDS à clsacalgary2016@gmail.com. Veuillez indiquer votre nom de famille, ainsi que les mots Contributions ACDS dans le champ « Objet ». Pour présenter, vous devez être membre de l’ACDS. Vous devez aussi compléter votre inscription au Congrès et acquitter les frais d’inscription au Congrès, qui comprennent aussi les frais de conférence pour l’ACDS.
Des renseignements supplémentaires portant sur l’inscription, le logement et le programme des activités du Congrès sont offerts sur le site Internet du Congrès à http://congres2016.ca/.

Reconciliation and the Metis in Canada

Thu, 2015-10-08 12:02 -- manager

 

Reconciliation and the Metis in Canada

October 23 – 25, 2015

 

In Partnership with the Metis Treaties Project, Institute of Canadian and Aboriginal Affairs, Chair of Metis Research and the Faculty of Law at the University of Ottawa

 

Fauteaux Hall, University of Ottawa

57 Louis Pasteur Priv.

Ottawa, Ontario

 

This conference is intended to bring together scholars of various disciplines to consider outstanding questions regarding the state of Metis affairs in Canada.  Relevant topics include the debate around questions about who are the legitimate Metis and what is the nature and source of their rights.  The conference will also consider and examine the growing and deeper scholarly history of Metis people that has emerged and how this enriched history and understanding can relate to and assist in legal and policy development. 

 

We also intend to highlight historical relations between Metis peoples and First Nation peoples and how this relationship can manifest today.  Moreover, the conference will explore the historical and evolving relationship between the Metis and the Crown.  This will entail a review of constitutional and legal developments and how they may contribute to new models of Metis – Crown relations. 

 

These are difficult topics and will no doubt generate controversy and debate.  It is hoped that this conference and the debate that ensues will be a small step towards a deeper and richer understanding of the Metis and the relationships between the Metis and others. 

 

 

 

 

Agenda

 

Day 1:  October 23 (Fauteaux Hall)

 

Format

Panel Theme

Speakers/Participants

Comments/Location

Registration

 

5:00 – 5:30

 

 

Fauteaux Hall Foyer

 

Welcoming Remarks

 

5:30-5:40

 

Nathalie Des Rosiers, Dean, Common Law

 

Welcome by Benny Michaud, President Ottawa Regional Metis Council

 

Room  351

Keynote

 

5:40 – 6:30

Keynote Address

Paul Chartrand

The Constitutional Status And Rights of the Metis in Canada.

Introduction by Tony Belcourt

 

Room 351

Welcoming Reception

 

6:30 – 8:00

 

 

Reception food provided with Cash Bar

 

3rd Floor Lounge

 

 

 

Day 2:  October 24, (Fauteaux Hall, Room 147)

 

Panel 1

 

9:00 – 10:30

Perspectives on the Nature of Metis Social and Political Structures

Nicholas Vrooman

"Aboriginal Rights Litigation and Negotiation among the Metis of BC: Community Perspectives on Creating Legal Change"

 

Kerry Sloan

"Montana's Metis: Federal Recognition & Shared State/Tribal Sovereignty"

 

Nathalie Kermoal

“Navigating the Troubled Waters of Politics to develop a Métis Social Project: The Canative Example”

Melanie Mallet (Chair – Discussant)

 

All Panel Presentations will be in room 147

Break

10:30 – 10:40

 

 

Coffee, Tea and Snacks Provided

Panel 2

 

 

10:40 – 12:10

Mapping Narratives of Metisness, and Community

Jennifer Adese

"Métis Were Clearly in the Northwest: Narrating Métisness in Constitutional Debates and the Abuse/Misuse of s.35"

 

Signa Daum Shanks

“Being Presentist for the Sake of Passing On Knowledge: Using Community Stories to Help Improve Modern Social Relations”

 

Brenda MacDougall

"Towards Spacial Justice: Stories of Metis Families in Place and Space”

Nicole St. Onge (Chair – Discussant)

Lunch

 

12:10 – 1:10

Short film and tribute to the work of Dr. Raoul McKay

 

Lunch Provided

Panel 3

 

1:10 – 2:40

 

 

Metis as Aboriginal, Indigenous or Other

Sebastien Grammond

“How Courts Perceive Aboriginal Communities”

 

Chris Andersen

“Peoplehood and nationhood: concepts for understanding historical legal context”

 

Denis Gagnon

“A return to politics  - The Senate and Métis identity”

 Karen Drake (Chair – Discussant)

Break

 

2:40 – 3:00

 

 

Coffee, Tea and Snacks Provided

Panel 4

 

3:00 – 4:30

Metis as Treaty Parties?

Brenda Gunn

"Relevance of International Treaty Law to the Question of Metis Treaties"

 

Adam Gaudry

“Peace, Friendship, and Family: A history of Métis-First Nations diplomacy in the nineteenth century”

 

Darren O’toole

“The Manitoba Treaty – A Critical Perspective of Manitoba Metis Federation

Alexandre Michaud (Chair – Discussant)

 

Day 3:  October 25, (Fauteaux Hall, Room 347)

 

Panel 5

 

9:30 - 11:00

Contemporary Metis – Crown Relations and Metis Rights Issues

Joseph Magnet

“Aspects of Daniels v. Canada

 

Cathy Bell

“The Daniels Case and Erosion of Inter-jurisdictional Immunity:  Implications for Alberta Metis Settlements”.

 

Larry Chartrand

“Rethinking the Plenary Nature of Section 91(24):  Implications for Metis”

Yvonne Boyer (Chair – Discussant)

Break

 

11:00 – 11:10

 

 

Coffee, Tea and Snacks Provided

Academic Roundtable Discussions

 

11:10 – 12:45

General Discussion of Issues Raised and Ideas for Research and Collaboration

Conference Attendees who wish to contribute to a discussion of the issues raised or ideas of future direction for the Metis Treaties Project. 

 

Lunch Keynote

 

12:45 – 1:30

 

Gabriel Dumont and the Gabriel Dumont Institute

Darren Prefontaine and Karon Shmon

“Gabriel Dumont and the Gabriel Dumont Institute, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan”

Lunch Provided

Reflections and Conclusions

 

1:30 – 2:00

Closing Remarks and Recommendations

 

 

 

_____________________________________

Professor Douglas C Hay Conference-York University

Thu, 2015-10-08 11:59 -- manager

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

            To honour the recent retirement of Professor C. Douglas Hay from York University, where he held appointments in the Department of History and Osgoode Hall Law School, a conference in his honour will be held at York University on Thursday, 5 May 2016.  “Doug” is one of the best-known legal historians in the English-speaking world, an achievement recently recognized when the American Society of Legal History named him an honorary fellow.  While his scholarship has been devoted primarily to British topics, Doug has also contributed to Canadian legal history, particularly with respect to post-1760 Quebec.  His work on both Britain and Canada has been an inspiration to Canadian scholars for its scope, ambition, sophistication and creative utilization of sources, while providing interpretive frameworks that have been readily adopted in a broad range of Canadian scholarship.    

            The organizers expect that the British historical community will find its own way of honouring Doug.  This conference is aimed at Canadianists who have worked on topics or themes similar to those found in Doug’s scholarship, or who have employed his approaches in their own writing.  We are particularly interested in hearing from Doug’s former graduate students.  Proposals are welcome from scholars or graduate students in any academic discipline, from independent scholars, and from those in professional practice.  The only substantive requirement is that the proposal engage with the nexus of law and history in some way.

            A selection of the papers will appear in a theme issue of the Osgoode Hall Law Journal devoted to Doug’s career and legacy.  Papers chosen as candidates for publication must pass through the Journal's peer review requirements. 

            500-word paper proposals should be sent to us at the email addresses below by Monday 7 December 2015. Decisions will be made early in January 2016. Applications for funding are in progress and we aim to provide reimbursement for travel costs of graduate students, pre-tenure scholars and those in precarious work situations.  Please indicate in your proposal whether you are likely to need such support. 

 

Philip Girard, Osgoode Hall Law School, pgirard@osgoode.yorku.ca

Jim Phillips, University of Toronto Faculty of Law & Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History, j.phillips@utoronto.ca

William Wicken, York University Department of History, wwicken@yorku.ca     

2015 Law, Literature & the Humanities Association of Australasia Conference - "Complicities"

Thu, 2015-02-19 18:26 -- manager
LAW, LITERATURE AND THE HUMANITIES ASSOCIATION OF AUSTRALASIA CONFERENCE,
UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY, SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA
DATES: 10 - 12 DECEMBER 2015
(With 9 December as a postgraduate day)
 
Complicity is a state of being complex or involved, and no matter where we are, or what we do, law is
part of our entanglement in the world. This conference will explore law’s complex relations with culture,
politics and capital. It will investigate law as an accomplice, as well as law’s role in shaping (and resisting)
certain problematic moral, political and material positions.
 
The LLH Association of Australasia invites scholarly and creative research from academics and graduate
students working at the intersection of law and the humanities, whether based in legal theory or in
disciplines such as literature, art, film, music, history, continental philosophy, anthropology, psychoanalysis,
visual culture, or cultural studies. Contributions may take a variety of forms from traditional academic
papers to poster presentations, video, or other genres or media.
 
The conference invites consideration of the following questions:
• What does complicity reveal about law’s methods and modes, its affects and effects?
• How are law’s genres, narratives, processes and images complicit in the creation of particular
imaginaries, materialities and practices of the everyday?
• How might we work within visual, narrative, creative and textual domains and devise strategies to
reveal and counter law's complicities, and acknowledge our own?
 
We ask you to make your own interpretation of the theme ‘Complicities,’ and invite scholars from a range
of disciplines to propose papers, complete panels and streams. Proposals should consist of a short
abstract (max. 250 words) and a short author bio. Please submit your abstract online at www.llh.uts.edu.au
 
Deadline for Stream Proposals: 31 March, 2015
Deadline for Paper and Panel Proposals: 1 May 2015
 
For all conference information including on-line registration, check our web site at this address:
 
And for further information, contact the Co-convenors, Dr Honni van Rijswijk and Associate Professor
Penny Crofts at llh@uts.edu.au.

Osgoode Forum 2015 - Osgoode Hall Law School

Thu, 2015-01-08 17:45 -- manager

Sex, Drugs & Rock ‘n Roll

 

Subversive Sites in the Law

Change and stability, evolution and historical continuity, progress and constancy – these are conflicting demands that society and its members make of the law and legal institutions.  Knowledge accumulates, past truths are shown to be false, and historical anomalies come to dominate the present.  Heraclitus, the ancient Greek philosopher stated that “everything changes and nothing stands still”.  If change is the only constant, how have, do, and should law and legal institutions respond, resist, react, accommodate, accept, or suppress social change and the agents of change?

Sex, Drugs, and Rock ‘n Roll is a credo associated with counter-culture, subversion, and resistance. Subversive sites of contestation exist not only because of constant change but also because of the failure of law to capture and accommodate individual realities, complexities, and varieties. There are many sites where individuals have reacted against dominant social views, perceptions, prescriptions, and propaganda. Some pursue activities, practices, and social arrangements which are illegal, disruptive, or unsanctioned – recent examples being Occupy Movements in light of the 2008 Financial Crisis; Hong Kong’s Umbrella Revolution; Aboriginal blockades and Idle No More movements in Canada; homeless encampments; and polygamist communities.  Such resistance has resulted in positive social change as well as socially sanctioned violence, persecution, and prosecution. Others suppress desires and needs, hide actions, or suffer in obscurity.  The prevailing social approach, action, or reaction may create barriers, thereby excluding the rebels, disrupters, outcasts, abnormals, dissenters, immorals, and perverts from full participation in society.  

The 2015 Osgoode Forum takes a wide, inclusive, view of Sex, Drugs, and Rock ‘n Roll:

·         Sex includes: sex; gender; sex selection; sexual abuse; sexual harassment; sex and gender bias/equity, sexuality; gender; sexual practices; sexual orientation; sex trade; and reproductive rights.

·         Drugs include: illegal drugs; war on drugs; legalization, regulation, and decriminalization; religious or cultural uses; medicines; patenting; indigenous or traditional medicines; regulation of food and natural remedies; medical research funding; availability of life-saving drugs; and mandatory vaccinations.

·         Rock ‘n Roll includes: Counter culture, subversion, and resistance; Performers, consumers, and property ownership; censorship; sponsorship; cultural appropriation; intellectual property rights - and many other sites that include, but are not limited to: territoriality; immigration; displacement; land claims; natural and economic resources; and social and ecological conservation.

If you would like to know how your paper fits into the conference topic, email a short description to glsa@osgoode.yorku.ca

As we celebrate the 125th anniversary of Osgoode Hall Law School, the 2015 Forum will focus on change and continuity in the law, and will examine how law is shaped by political, economic, and cultural forces.

We invite participants to reflect on subversive sites in the law in the past, the present, and into the future though proposals for papers, presentations, panels, and other interventions (including art-based and performance contributions) from Master’s and Doctoral students, artists, and activists.

Osgoode is committed to the promotion of interdisciplinary scholarship addressing the nature and function of law and legal institutions, and the impact of law in our changing world. We are eager to accept proposals from a range of disciplines intersecting with law, including: cultural studies, criminology, political science, health studies, gender studies, sociology, anthropology, history, psychology, and philosophy.

 

 

Submissions Guidelines

 

Please submit your abstracts in English to glsa@osgoode.yorku.ca.

 

Abstracts or proposals should be between 250-500 words in length, and should include:

 

(i)            your name,

(ii)          title of the paper,

(iii)         your organization or institution (if any), and

(iv)         a list of up to five keywords.  

 

 

The abstract submission deadline is EXTENDED: end of the day January 31, 2015.

 

Successful applicants will be notified by February 7, 2015.

 

Final papers (maximum of 15,000 words) OR Drafts (1,000-1,500 words) must be submitted by May 9, 2015, to allow for dissemination so that forum participants can engage with authors and provide authors with feedback and comments.

 

Information about the conference site, accommodations, conference fees, and programming will be provided before the abstract submission deadline at http://glsa.osgoode.yorku.ca/

 

ASSOCIATION FOR LAW, PROPERTY & SOCIETY 6TH ANNUAL MEETING

Wed, 2014-10-15 17:31 -- manager

Association for Law, Property & Society 6th Annual Meeting

University of Georgia School of Law, Athens, Georgia USA

May 1-2, 2015

Call for Papers

 

The Association for Law, Property & Society (ALPS) is a scholarly organization for those engaged in scholarship on all aspects of property law and society.  Its annual meeting brings together scholars from many disciplines to discuss their work and to foster dialogue among those working in property law, policy, and theory. Prior meetings have averaged 150 participants, many coming from outside North America.

ALPS will hold its 6th Annual Meeting at the University of Georgia School of Law, Athens, Georgia USA, May 1-2, 2015.

We welcome papers on any subject related to property law, including pedagogy, and from a diversity of perspectives. As in previous years, we will have both draft paper panels and early works-in-progress panels dedicated to brainstorming scholarship at its beginning stages. We also plan to support early-career scholars in their development and in connecting to mentors through the conference events.

You may submit an individual paper or a panel (usually 4 presenters). Panel proposals may include a collection of paper presentations, roundtables, or book panels. Paper abstracts should not exceed 250 words. If submitting a panel, please submit a panel abstract and individual paper abstracts.

Registration and paper/panel submission is available through the conference website at http://www.alps.syr.edu

The deadline for submitting papers and panels is February 1, 2015, but registration for the conference will continue to be available after that date. Please do not submit papers and panels after February 1 as part of your registration without having emailed Jim Smith, jim@uga.edu for permission to submit late. We will do our best to accommodate late submission requests, but can only guarantee that proposals submitted by the February 1 deadline will be able to be considered for the conference.

A discounted early registration rate of $150 is available until February 1, 2015. After that date, the registration rate is $180. The registration rate for full-time students (JD, PhD, or other program) is $50.

In addition, in recognition of the international and interdisciplinary diversity of ALPS members, we invite paper or panel submissions relating to the following special themes:

·         Eviction and Displacement

·         Law and Geography

 

We will cluster papers and panels submitted in connection with these themes in such manner as to allow conference participants to attend all panels organized around each theme.

The standard length of each session will be 90 minutes and we expect sessions to include time for questions and discussion from the audience as well as presentation.

 

 

Australian and New Zealand Critical Criminology Conference

Mon, 2014-06-16 19:10 -- manager

CALL FOR PAPERS

The 8th Annual Australian and New Zealand Critical Criminology Conference

Thursday 4th - Friday 5th December 2014 at the Monash Law Chambers, 555 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne, Victoria

Abstract submissions are now being accepted for the 8th Annual Australian and New Zealand Critical Criminology Conference hosted by Monash University, to be held in Melbourne on 4-5 December 2014.

The theme of the conference is Critical Criminology: Research Praxis and Social Transformation in a Global EraThe conference will bring together academics, cross-sector stakeholders, legal practitioners, advocates, activists and students to reflect and renew discussions about the status and future of critical criminology. The conference will consider the unique and important place of critical criminology, with a particular focus on the multi-level barriers that impact on transformative research agendas and collaborations in the current social, political and economic climate.

The conference streams include:

1. Re-theorizing Punishment’s Borders and Boundaries

2. Movements against State and Corporate Harm

3. Seeking Real Access to Justice

4. The Prospects of, and Limits Placed Upon, Transformative Justice

5. Campaigns for Justice

6. Surveillance and the Technologies of Control

7. From Theory to Praxis: Challenges in Critical Criminology

Abstracts for individual/co-authored papers and themed panel submissions are encouraged.

Please note: Abstracts will subject to a process of peer-review and not all abstracts may be accepted. Abstracts should be received on or before Monday 30 June 2014.

The organisers also welcome expressions of interest for those wishing to launch a new publication or research initiative at the conference. If you have something you would like to launch, please contact the conference organisers at: criticalcriminology@monash.edu

Our Keynote Plenary Panels feature the following speakers:

Panel One: Critical Research and Institutional Violence

Professor Phil Scraton (Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland); Dr Elizabeth Stanley (Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand) and Dr Thalia Anthony (University of Technology Sydney, Australia)

Panel Two: Regulation and Online Cultures

Associate Professor Thomas Crofts (University of Sydney, Australia); Associate Professor Murray Lee (University of Sydney, Australia) and Professor Gail Mason (University of Sydney, Australia)

Panel Three: Punishment, Otherness and Morality

Dr Anna Eriksson (Monash University, Australia); Professor Harry Blagg (University of Western Australia) and Dr Claire Spivakovsky (Monash University, Australia)

Panel Four: Anti-State Research and the Politics of Containment: What Can Radical Criminology Say and Do?

Professor Scott Poynting (University of Auckland, New Zealand); Dr Vicki Sentas (University of New South Wales, Australia) and Dr Mike Grewcock (University of New South Wales, Australia)

For information on the conference and to submit an abstract, please visit:

http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/critical-criminology/

For further information please email: criticalcriminology@monash.edu

Canadian Journal of Disability Studies Special Issue on Law, Religion and Disability

Thu, 2014-05-29 15:42 -- manager
Call for proposals: “Law, Religion and Disability”
Special Issue of the Canadian Journal of Disability Studies
 
The relationship of law, religion and disability is complex, emerging and still in development as a research area. Scholarship on religion and disability has included feminist reflections regarding religion and disability (e.g. Minister 2013) and analysis of the physical isolation that can result in congregations where accommodations are made but without reflection on the communal aspects of integration (Eiesland 1994). Further, health care providers working with disabled individuals negotiate and navigate their own religious identities in their professional sphere (Bray, Egan and Beagan 2012). Legal advancement within the disability movement has produced results such as the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act. Public and policy challenges remain highly contested and disability advocates reflect on the limitations of existing policy as well as the challenge of the application of these policies (e.g. Prince 2012; Johner 2013).
 
We are seeking articles that articulate the diverse perspectives of disability studies as it relates both to law and religion. There are multiple ways the religion, law and disability intersect with one another. The special issue intends to explore overlapping themes in dialogue to reflect on the current discourse about disability, disabled identities and its interconnections with law and religion.
 
Possible topics can include, but are not limited to:
  • What social, cultural or religious norms have created exclusive or inclusive environments? E.g. What constraints might the Quebec Charter of Values have created for individuals at the intersection of religion and disabled identities?
  • Religious individuals and organizations face challenges regarding the theological debates regarding inclusivity versus exclusivity in the accommodation of disabled individuals. What are some of the challenges of negotiating theological doctrine and what are the nuances made possible through theology regarding disability? 
  • How is disability taught or not taught, in schools or within religious institutions? What are the policies in the education system regarding disability and what challenges are ongoing regarding education and disability?
  • How do religious organizations and law respond to disability within a health framework? What challenges are faced by healthcare workers who are religiously identified or disabled? In what ways are religion, law and disability or disabled identities negotiated?
 
We welcome submissions from across the disciplines of law, religious studies and disability studies, as well as submissions from outside those fields. Proposals should be no more than 2 pages in length (single spaced) and should include: theoretical and methodological approach; central thesis or argument; and data used within article (i.e. legislation, doctrine). Proposals must be submitted to Ravi Malhotra (Ravi.Malhotra@uottawa.ca) and Heather Shipley (hshipley@uottawa.ca) by September 30, 2014. Notifications will be sent out by November 15, 2014 and final submissions will be due January 30, 2015. Full articles should be between 6,000-7,000 words, using the Turabian style guide (16th Edition) or another recognized citation style. All final articles will be subject to the peer-review process. Publication is conditional on reviewer reports. As per Canadian Journal of Disability Studies policies, all methods and methodologies and disciplines are welcome, as are submissions in French or English. This CFP additionally invites perspectives on religion from across traditions, and legal perspectives from outside of Canada or North America
 

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