Educating Justice: Post-Secondary Education in the Justice Disciplines

Thu, 2014-02-27 17:02 -- manager

Call for Papers

Educating Justice: Post-secondary Education in the Justice Disciplines

Educating Justice is the theme for this year’s conference hosted by the Centre for Interdisciplinary Justice Studies (CIJS) at the Department of Criminal Justice, The University of Winnipeg, May 8-10, 2014.

We call for papers that explore the development and current organization of criminal justice (CJ) and social justice studies programs at universities in Canada and which place such developments in the context of the growth of related fields in North America. The development of post-secondary CJ programs in Canada is an understudied phenomenon and even fewer reflections have been published on crossovers with other justice studies programs. The CIJS 2014 conference will create a record of and debate about the development of justice studies in Canada.

Our conference theme is shaped by our own experiences at the University of Winnipeg (UW). The CJ program at UW began as an interdisciplinary major. Over time, our CJ faculty attempted to build a program that was theoretically oriented while not losing sight of its applied roots. The development of the UW program highlights key tensions underlying the growth of CJ programs in Canada today. The journey can best be described as a mitigation of the protective services orientation (Frauley 2005) – a pejorative description of CJ leveled by critical scholars of crime, law and society. The literature portrays the development of these programs as descendants of applied criminology or as handmaidens to the state (Chunn and Menzies 1999; Frauley 2005; Menzies and Chunn 2006). Yet there is considerable diversity in programs across the country.

We wish to open dialogue about the nature of CJ education as well as justice and education more generally in Canada.

We invite session and paper submissions representing criminological, economic, political, historical, legal, feminist, and philosophical insights into education and justice; professional reflections and research on justice and education as well as pedagogy; area-based uses of justice such as social justice, restorative justice, ecological justice, urban justice, human rights, and reflections on the problems and potentials of justice education and crossover in the classroom. We are keen to receive session and paper submissions that reflect on the creation of justice studies and criminal justice studies departments, institutes, curricula, and programing in Canada or elsewhere and the challenges associated with such endeavours. We welcome session and paper submissions from scholars of all disciplinary backgrounds, students, community organizations, justice professionals and researchers, artists, activists and anyone who wishes to engage in an intellectual conversation on justice education.

We are particularly interested in sessions and papers that examine the justice disciplines at other Canadian post-secondary institutions. We take a broad view of what constitutes the justice disciplines and encourage submissions from scholars involved with programs in criminal justice, justice studies, criminology, socio-legal studies, and other allied disciplines with a scholarly focus on justice. We would also like to see submissions on social justice studies programs, including on recent closures of such educational sites.

 

Proposals for papers, panels or other submissions must be received no later than March 26. You can submit proposals at cijs.ca or to s.kohm@uwinnipeg.ca.

 Proposals must include:

  • mailing address, e-mail, phone number, and affiliation for each participant
  • abstract of not more than 500 words for sessions
  • abstract of not more than 250 words for individual paper presentations

 

Vist the http://cijs.ca/ website for more information.